2016 Jane Addams Winner ‘Turning 15 on the Road to Freedom’ Takes to the Stage #JACBA Newsletter 20Jan2017

Bridge Street Theatre to Celebrate Black History Month with TURNING 15 ON THE ROAD TO FREEDOM

In celebration of Black History Month, an electrifying first-hand account of the 1965 march from Selma to Montgomery takes the stage at Catskill’s Bridge Street Theatre on February 10, 11, and 12.

Originally developed at Fiorello LaGuardia High School for Music, Art, and Performing Arts in NYC, this stage adaptation of Lynda Blackmon Lowery’s award-winning book for young readers is directed by actress, author, director and teacher Ally Sheedy and powerfully performed by dynamic young actress Damaras Obi.

Read More

Turning 15 on the Road to Freedom: My Story of the 1965 Selma Voting Rights March by Lynda Blackmon Lowery as told to Elspeth Leacock and Susan Buckley, 2016 Awardee


Suggested reading on civil rights movement and Martin Luther King Jr.

Elementary school

“Seeds of Freedom: The Peaceful Integration of Huntsville, Alabama” by Hester Bass; illustrated by E. B. Lewis

“We March” by Shane W. Evans

“Sit-In: How Four Friends Stood Up by Sitting Down” by Andrea Davis Pinkney; illustrated by Brian Pinkney

“Belle, the Last Mule at Gee’s Bend” by Calvin Alexander Ramsey and Bettye Stroud; illustrated by John Holyfield

“28 Days: Moments in Black History that Changed the World” by Charles R. Smith; illustrated by Shane W. Evans

“Separate Is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez and Her Family’s Fight for Desegregation” by Duncan Tonatiuh

“Lillian’s Right to Vote” by Jonah Winter; illustrated by Shane Evans

“Freedom in Congo Square” by Carole Boston Weatherford

Middle school

“Marching to the Mountaintop: How Poverty, Labor Fights, and Civil Rights Set the Stage for Martin Luther King Jr.’s Final Hours” by Ann Bausum

“Birmingham Sunday” by Larry Dane Brimner

“The Girl from the Tar Paper School: Barbara Rose Johns and the Advent of the Civil Rights Movement” by Teri Kanefield

“Turning 15 on the Road to Freedom: My Story of the 1965 Selma Voting Rights March” by Lynda Blackmon Lowery as told to Elspeth Leacock and Susan Buckley; illustrated by PJ Loughran

“Voice of Freedom: Fannie Lou Hamer: The Spirit of the Civil Rights Movement” by Carole Boston Weatherford; illustrated by Ekua Holmes

“Revolution” by Deborah Wiles

“Brown Girl Dreaming” by Jacqueline Woodson

High school and older

“Black & White: The Confrontation Between Reverend Fred L. Shuttlesworth and Eugene ‘Bull’ Connor” by Larry Dane Brimner

“We’ve Got a Job: The 1963 Birmingham Children’s March” by Cynthia Levinson

“No Crystal Stair: A Documentary Novel of the Life and Work of Lewis Michaux, Harlem Bookseller” by Vaunda Micheaux Nelson; illustrated by R. Gregory Christie

“Marching for Freedom: Walk Together, Children, and Don’t You Grow Weary” by Elizabeth Partridge

Read More


Illustrator Kadir Nelson Envisions Martin Luther King Jr. for Cover of New Yorker

THIS WEEK’S THE NEW YORKER boasts a cover image of Martin Luther King Jr., by Los Angeles artist Kadir Nelson. In the illustration, the civil rights legend’s brow is furrowed.

“What would Dr. King think of the world today? My image is a celebration of Dr. King and his vision. What happened to his dream of racial and economic equality, and what is the impact of non-violent resistance over half a century later?” – Kadir Nelson, The New Yorker

Read More

The Village That Vanished written by Ann Grifalconi and illustrated by Kadir Nelson 2003 Awardee

Heart and Soul: The Story of America and African Americans written and illustrated by Kadir Nelson 2012 Awardee


Remembering King: 10 Books to Celebrate M.L. King Jr. Day

Martin Luther King, Jr.: Man of Peace – Patricia & Fredrick Jr. McKissack

The simple text and illustrations describe the life and accomplishments of the revered civil rights pioneer

I Have a Dream – Kadir Nelson

On August 28, 1963, on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington, Martin Luther King gave one of the most powerful and memorable speeches in our nation’s history. His words, paired with Caldecott Honor winner Kadir Nelson’s magnificent paintings, make for a picture book certain to be treasured by children and adults alike.

I’ve Seen the Promised Land: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. – Walter Dean Myers

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., is one of the most celebrated figures of the twentieth century. A crusader for nonviolent social justice, he led African Americans in their demands for equality through peaceful protests during one of the most tumultuous times in recent history. Set against key moments in the civil rights movement, here is the story of the powerful, eloquent spiritual leader and his belief that nonviolence could be used to overcome racial discrimination.

Read More

A Long Hard Journey: The Story of the Pullman Porter written by Patricia and Fredrick McKissack 1990 Awardee

The Village That Vanished written by Ann Grifalconi and illustrated by Kadir Nelson 2003 Awardee

Heart and Soul: The Story of America and African Americans written and illustrated by Kadir Nelson 2012 Awardee

Now Is Your Time! The African-American Struggle for Freedom written by Walter Dean Myers 1992 Awardee

Patrol: An American Soldier in Vietnam written by Walter Dean Myers 2003 Awardee


NBC News: From Hashtag to Movement to Book: #WeNeedDiverseBooks Publishes First Anthology

started as a hashtag response to an all-white, all-male panel of children’s book authors at a 2014 BookCon reader event has resulted in a newly-published book aiming to promote diversity in children’s literature.

Since 2014, the hashtag #WeNeedDiverseBooks has grown into the We Need Diverse Books (WNDB) nonprofit organization supporting diversity in children’s literature.

Now, its first book – “Flying Lessons & Other Stories,” a middle-grade anthology for children ages 8 to 12 released this week by Crown Books for Young Readers.

Stories range from basketball dreams to family fiascos, first crushes, new neighborhoods, and more.

Read More

Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson 2013 Awardee

From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun written by Jacqueline Woodson 1996 Awardee

I Hadn’t Meant to Tell You This written by Jacqueline Woodson 1995 Awardee

Crossing Bok Chitto: told in written form by nationally recognized Choctaw storyteller, Tim Tingle 2007 Awardee

Now Is Your Time! The African-American Struggle for Freedom written by Walter Dean Myers 1992 Awardee

Patrol: An American Soldier in Vietnam written by Walter Dean Myers 2003 Awardee


State building named for student whose civil rights strike led to school changes

The newly-renovated state building that houses the Office of the Attorney General has been named after Barbara Johns, Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe announced at the Community Leaders Breakfast honoring Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Friday morning.

Read More

The Girl From the Tar Paper School: Barbara Rose Johns and the advent of the Civil Rights Movement by Teri Kanefield 2015 Awardee


PW Picks: Books of the Week, January 9, 2017

The March Against Fear: The Last Great Walk of the Civil Rights Movement and the Emergence of Black Power
Ann Bausum. National Geographic Children’s, $18.99 (144p) ISBN 978-1-4263-2665-3

In a powerful and timely book, Bausum (Stonewall) focuses her attention on the last great march of the civil rights era, the March Against Fear, from Memphis, Tenn., to Jackson, Miss., in June 1966.

This exemplary look into civil rights history concludes with perspective and encouragement regarding ongoing struggles for social change.

Read More

Marching to the Mountaintop: How Poverty, Labor Fights and Civil Rights Set the Stage for Martin Luther King Jr’s Final Hours, written by Ann Bausum 2013 Awardee

With Courage and Cloth: Winning the Fight for a Woman’s Right to Vote, by Ann Bausum 2005 Awardee

Marching to the Mountaintop: How Poverty, Labor Fights and Civil Rights Set the Stage for Martin Luther King Jr’s Final Hours, written by Ann Bausum 2013 Awardee


A Grown-Up Learning Experience for a Nine-Year-Old: A Week in Jail

Cynthia Levinson and illustrator Vanessa Brantley Newton have brought to life the experience of Audrey Faye Hendricks who listened wide-eyed and thoughtfully at grown-up talk about fighting for Civil Rights. It’s a picture book called The Youngest Marcher: The Story of Audrey Faye Hendricks, a Young Civil Rights Activist.

Read More

We’ve Got a Job: The 1963 Birmingham Children’s March written by Cynthia Levinson 2013 Awardee

We Shall Overcome: The Story of a Song written by Debbie Levy and illustrated by Vanessa Brantley-Newton 2014 Awardee


Obituary: Marilyn Sachs

Sachs credits her desire to avoid bullying, and a rich family history of storytellers, as catalysts for developing a talent for “rearranging the truth” and telling tales.

Read More

The Big Book for Peace edited by Ann Durell and Marilyn Sachs 1991 Awardee

A Pocket Full of Seeds written by Marilyn Sachs 1974 Awardee


Kerry James Marshall and Faith Ringgold Receive CAA Awards for Distinction

The College Art Association (CAA) has announced the recipients of the 2017 Awards for Distinction, which celebrates the achievements of artists, art historians, authors, conservators, curators, and critics whose work has an impact both in their professional fields and the art world at large.

Kerry James Marshall is the recipient of the 2017 CAA Artist Award for Distinguished Body of Work, while Faith Ringgold is the winner of the 2017 CAA Distinguished Artist Award for Lifetime Achievement.

Ringgold, who is widely considered one of the most influential living African American artists, has been awarded for her multidisciplinary work, comprising painting, quilts, sculpture, performance, and children’s books, which explores Civil Rights, racial justice, feminism, and art history.

Read More

Aunt Harriet’s Underground Railroad in the Sky by Faith Ringgold 1993 Awardee


Kirsten Greenidge on adapting the beloved Bud, Not Buddy for the stage

When Christopher Paul Curtis wrote the children’s book, Bud, Not Buddy, in 1999 it quickly became a darling among book critics and beloved by families everywhere. The cherished book won two prestigious awards: the 2000 John Newbery Medal for Excellence in Children’s Literature and the Coretta Scott King Award.

“It could all sound very bleak and if you take all the little things that happen to him, it sounds awful, but I hope people find there is a lot of inspiration in this little boy’s story. He never gives up and he find the good in people, and the people he meets, finds the humanity in him.”

Read More

Elijah of Buxton by Christopher Paul Curtis 2008 Awardee

The Watsons Go to Birmingham – 1963 by Christopher Paul Curtis 1996 Awardee


Abbot Library to host Poetry Salon

The Abbot Public Library will host a Poetry Salon about Lucille Clifton from 2 to 4 p.m. Jan. 22 at the library, 235 Pleasant St., Marblehead.

She is noted for saying much with few words. Poet Robin Becker commented on Clifton’s lean style: “Clifton’s poetics of understatement – no capitalization, few strong stresses per line, many poems totaling fewer than 20 lines, the sharp rhetorical question – includes the essential only.”
For Clifton, writing was “a way of continuing to hope … perhaps, for me, it is a way of remembering I am not alone.”

Read More

Amifika written by Lucille Clifton 1978 Awardee


On this day, the ground convulsed in Haiti, killing thousands

Renowned Haitian-American author Edwidge Danticat dedicated a memorial wall in honor of those killed during the quake’s 35 seconds. “We would need never-ending walls to write all of the names,” Danticat said during the ceremony. “We are here remembering the faces, the smiles, the hopes, the dreams of each and every one of those who died seven years ago and what they meant to those who loved them.”

Read More

Mama’s Nightingale: A Story of Immigration and Separation written by Edwidge Danticat 2016 Awardee

Since 1953, the Jane Addams Children’s Book Award annually acknowledges
books published in the U.S. during the previous year. Books commended by the
Award address themes of topics that engage children in thinking about peace,
justice, world community and/or equality of the sexes and all races. The books
also must meet conventional standards of literacy and artistic excellence.

A national committee chooses winners and honor books for younger and older children.

Read more about the 2016 Awards.

No Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *