Jane Addams Author Pam Muñoz Ryan Recipient of Américas Award for Children’s and Young Adult Literature JACBA Newsletter 30Sept2016
Newsletter , Uncategorized / September 30, 2016

Award recognizes excellence in children’s books that portray Latin American culture Two children’s book authors have been awarded the 2016 Américas Award for Children’s and Young Adult Literature, coordinated by Vanderbilt University’s Center for Latin American Studies and Tulane University. This year’s recipients, Pam Muñoz Ryan, author of Echo, and Ashley Hope-Perez, author of Out of Darkness, were honored Sept. 22 at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. Award decisions center on four main criteria: distinctive literary quality; how accurately it represents Latin culture; exceptional integration of text, illustration and design; and potential for classroom use. Read More Esperanza Rising written by Pam Muñoz Ryan 2001 Awardee Datebook: ‘Elizabeth Catlett & Benny Andrews’ at Hemphill Fine Arts, Washington D.C The exhibition presents the paintings of Benny Andrews (1930-2006) and sculptures by Elizabeth Catlett (1915-2012). [B]oth individually asserted the validity of their own lives and the humanity around them, communicating a spiritual dignity that still resonates in today’s world.both individually asserted the validity of their own lives and the humanity around them, communicating a spiritual dignity that still resonates in today’s world. Read More Delivering Justice: W. W. Law and the Fight for Civil Rights, written by Jim Haskins, illustrated…

Edwidge Danticat and Katherine Paterson in Podcast Interviews JACBA Newsletter 23Sept2016
Newsletter , Uncategorized / September 23, 2016

Podcast #129: Edwidge Danticat on Silence, Bridging Audiences, and Participating in Stories Edwidge Danticat is a MacArthur Fellow “Genius Grant” recipient and author, best known for her book Brother, I’m Dying. In 2010, she visited the Library to talk about her essay collection Create Dangerously: The Immigrant Artist at Work. For this week’s episode of the New York Public Library Podcast, we’re proud to present Edwidge Danticat discussing silence, bridging audiences, and participating in stories. Read More Mama’s Nightingale: A Story of Immigration and Separation written by Edwidge Danticat, illustrated by Leslie Staub 2016 Awardee Podcast: Katherine Paterson Former National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature Katherine Paterson is the newest in our series of National Book Festival author podcasts. Karen Jaffee talks to Paterson about the author’s new memoir, “Stories of My Life.” The 2016 Library of Congress National Book Festival, which is free for everyone, will be held at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center on Saturday, Sept. 24, from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Katherine Paterson will appear on the History & Biography stage, sponsored by Wells Fargo, as well as participate in the evening Books to Movies presentation. Read More The Same Stuff as Stars by Katherine…

Engle Recipient of Lee Hopkins Poetry Award & National Student Poets have Passion for Justice and Quest for Beauty JACBA Newsletter 17Sept2016
Newsletter , Uncategorized / September 19, 2016

Engle to receive Lee Bennett Hopkins Poetry Award Sept. 20Verse memoir by Cuban-American author contrasts her two worlds Margarita Engle, 2016 winner of the Lee Bennett Hopkins Poetry Award, will receive the national children’s poetry honor at 4 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 20, in Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library, on Penn State’s University Park campus. Following the award presentation, Engle will speak about her writing, specifically the use of historical works to communicate with children, and show photos from Cuba to illustrate scenes from her winning verse memoir, “Enchanted Air: Two Cultures, Two Wings.” The Lee Bennett Hopkins Poetry Award is named for the internationally renowned educator, poet, anthologist, and passionate advocate of poetry for young people. Established in 1993, the award is presented annually to an American poet or anthologist for the most outstanding new book of poetry for children published in the previous calendar year. Read More Silver People: Voices from the Panama Canal by Margarita Engle 2015 Awardee The Surrender Tree: Poems of Cuba’s Struggle for Freedom, written by Margarita Engle 2009 Awardee White House Committee Names Five Student Poets For Prestigious National Student Poets Program The fifth annual class of the National Student Poets Program (NSPP)-the…

1974 & 1976 Jane Addams Winning Authors Heard Today “Writing is… a way to light a candle in a gale of wind.” (A. Childress) JACBA Newsletter 9Sept2016
Newsletter , Uncategorized / September 9, 2016

Theatre: At Intiman, a timely story about an interracial couple – set in the 1918 South “Wedding Band,” by Alice Childress, profiles an interracial couple in 1918 South Carolina, but its message is still timely. The play closes Intiman Theatre Festival’s seasonlong salute to black women playwrights. A Charleston, S.C., native, and great-granddaughter of slaves, Childress was keenly attuned to the civil-rights and feminist movements, and one of the first black women playwrights to win national recognition. Her well-read novel for young people, “A Hero Ain’t Nothin’ But a Sandwich,” about a 13-year-old heroin addict, became part of a 1982 Supreme Court case after a New York school district censored it and other books. Such reactions just proved to Childress that she was casting light on meaningful social issues that needed to be openly considered and addressed. “Writing is a labor of love and also an act of defiance,” she once wrote, “a way to light a candle in a gale wind.” Read More A Hero Ain’t Nothin’ But a Sandwich by Alice Childress 1974 Awardee Books to give you hope: Z for Zachariah by Robert C O’Brien This is a hard ending for a young reader to accept –…

Jane Addams authors Jacqueline Woodson and Jewel Parker Rhodes Give Meaning to History and Place JACBA Newsletter 2Sept2016
Newsletter , Uncategorized / September 2, 2016

Two New Novels Succeed in Telling the Story of 9/11 to Kids In Towers Falling, Jewell Parker Rhodes brings the narrative closer to Déja’s home in the tale of her father, who suffers from a mysterious ailment. He’s never acknowledged that his chain of joblessness began with the attacks. It’s a welcome exploration of the long-ranging costs of 9/11. Read More Sugar by Jewell Parker Rhodes 2014 Awardee The Ninth Ward by Jewell Parker Rhodes 2011 Awardee Jaqueline Woodson reading a poem about a Brooklyn neighborhood This month Jaqueline Woodson released her first novel for adults in many years, and has been talking about the history of Bushwick, the setting for Another Brooklyn. Read More Jacqueline Woodson: By the Book Tell us about your favorite picture books. And your favorite novels for children? One of my favorite picture books of all time is “The Little Match Girl,” by Hans Christian Andersen. When I was first introduced to that book as a child, I feel like I cried for a week. Then I was done and ready to go out and change the world! It was the first book that unlocked empathy in me. I also love John Steptoe’s “Stevie.” It…