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Book Itch author Vaunda Micheaux Nelson: Mind the Gaps: Books for ALL Young Readers #JACBA Newsletter 24Feb2017
Newsletter , Uncategorized / February 26, 2017

On Vaunda Micheaux Nelson’s “Mind the Gaps: Books for ALL Young Readers” (from 2015) In her article from the March/April 2015 issue of The Horn Book Magazine, author Vaunda Micheaux Nelson looks back at her bookish childhood and how it informs her work as a youth services librarian in Rio Rancho, New Mexico. To commemorate Black History Month, we are highlighting a series of articles, speeches, and reviews from The Horn Book archive that are by and/or about African American authors, illustrators, and luminaries in the field – one a day through the month of February, with a roundup on Fridays. Read More The Book Itch: Freedom, Truth & Harlem’s Greatest Bookstore by Vaunda Micheaux Nelson, illustrated by R. Gregory Christie 2016 Awardee Bookshelf: Five Iconic African-American Biographies for Kids Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat Written and illustrated by Javaka Steptoe Basquiat left a vibrant legacy that Steptoe, painting and collaging on salvaged wood pieces from Basquiat’s own hunting grounds, conveys to a new generation. Steptoe’s words, too, go straight for the heart, redeeming often harsh facts of the artist’s life by focusing on how both his strength and his pain powered his art. The Legendary…

Respecting and honoring so many voices in new and existent children’s literature JACBA Newsletter 17Feb017
Newsletter , Uncategorized / February 17, 2017

Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC) names 2017 Notable Children’s Books “Rudas: Nino’s Horrendous Hermanitas.” By Yuyi Morales. Illus. by the author. Roaring Brook/Neal Porter. “Thunder Boy Jr.” By Sherman Alexie. Illus. by Yuyi Morales. Little, Brown. “I Dissent: Ruth Bader Ginsburg Makes Her Mark.” By Debbie Levy. Illus. by Elizabeth Baddeley. Simon & Schuster. “A Poem for Peter: The Story of Ezra Jack Keats and the Creation of The Snowy Day.” By Andrea Davis Pinkney. Illus. by Lou Fancher and Steve Johnson. Viking. “Preaching to the Chickens: The Story of Young John Lewis.” By Jabari Asim. Illus. by E. B. Lewis. Penguin/Nancy Paulsen. “The Princess and the Warrior: A Tale of Two Volcanoes.” By Duncan Tonatiuh. Illus. by the author. Abrams. “Steamboat School.” By Deborah Hopkinson. Illus. by Ron Husband. Disney/Jump at the Sun. “We Will Not Be Silent: The White Rose Student Resistance Movement That Defied Adolf Hitler.” By Russell Freedman. illus. Clarion. “You Can Fly: The Tuskegee Airmen.” By Carole Boston Weatherford. Illus. by Jeffery Boston Weatherford. Atheneum. “Freedom in Congo Square.” By Carole Boston Weatherford. Illus. by R. Gregory Christie. little bee. “¬°Olinguito, de la A a la Z! / Olinguito, from A to Z!…

Books Help Kids Understand What It’s Like to Be a Refugee #JACBA Newsletter 10Feb2017
Newsletter , Uncategorized / February 10, 2017

Books to Help Kids Understand What It’s Like to Be a Refugee Mama’s Nightingale: A Story of Immigration and Separation by Edwidge Danticat, illustrated by Leslie Staub Danticat’s celebration of storytelling and the bond between mother and child is an empowering one. Saya, whose mother is being detained, writes a story inspired by her mother’s experience. When her father sends Saya’s story to a newspaper, she learns firsthand that one voice, one story, can make a difference. Inside Out and Back Again by Thanhha Lai Lai’s bestselling Newbery Honor book, written in short free verse, powerfully captures the alienation felt by a child forced into a new and often unwelcoming world. As 10-year-old Ha tries to adjust to life in Alabama, where she is bullied by her peers and befriended by a teacher who has some understanding of her experiences back in Vietnam, readers can empathize with Ha and all of those who are considered “foreigners” in this story of strength and resilience. The Red Pencil by Andrea Davis Pinkney, illustrated by Shane W. Evans Children’s literature powerhouse Andrea Davis Pinkney uses verse to tell Amira’s tale of loss, hardship, and ultimately hope. Pinkney notably offers a detailed picture of…

Jane Addams Honor Illustrator Javaka Steptoe Wins Caldecott JACBA Newsletter 3Feb017
Newsletter , Uncategorized / February 3, 2017

‘A Very Incredible Day’: Javaka Steptoe on His 2017 Caldecott Medal Steptoe admired Basquiat’s courage, conviction, and vision. “I like that that he stood up for himself,” he said. “He talked about history. His curiosity about the world was very impressive. And the way he put everything together and the way he used images is very poetic.” “Whatever I’m interested in saying – and people don’t necessarily have to agree with me – if I have something to say, I have a voice that’s going to be heard. It’s kind of like Spider-Man: with great power comes great responsibility. I appreciate that. I hope to be seen as someone who thinks deeply and cares about the world, and cares about what’s going on.” Read More Hot Day on Abbott Avenue by Karen English, with collage art of Javaka Steptoe 2005 Awardee Ruby Bridges, Civil Rights Activist to Speak at ASI Lectureship “ASI is honored to bring Ruby Bridges to our campus,” ASI president senior Emily Mylhousen said. “Our country is still hurting from racial tensions, as we often forget that the Civil Rights Movement is not as far back in our country’s history as we would like to think. Bridges’…