Get a haircut and get a book for back to school #JACBA Newsletter 18Aug2017

Get a haircut and a book; a sample of novel openings; saving the rainforest

Used to be that the only thing that might come with a haircut would be a shave. Right now and through the first day of school in September any child, aged 4 through 12, who gets his or her hair cut, braided, or styled at one of seven participating hair shops in Egleston Square will get to choose a book to take home for free.

And all the books, which were chosen in consultation with local librarians, “either feature a young child of color or are written or illustrated by artists of color,” says Luis Edgardo Cotto, executive director of Egleston Square Main Street, the neighborhood-based nonprofit sponsoring the Books in the Barbershop Summer Reading Initiative.

The works selected for the program, now in its second summer, include: “Drum Dream Girl: How One Girl’s Courage Changed Music” by Margarita Engle, illustrated by Rafael López; “Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat” by Javaka Steptoe; “Maybe Something Beautiful: How Art Transformed a Neighborhood” by F. Isabel Campoy and Theresa Howell and illustrated by Rafael López; “When We Fight, We Win: Twenty-First Century Social Movements and the Activists That Are Transforming Our World” by Greg Jobin-Leeds and Agit- Arte; and “Furqan’s First Flat Top” by Robert Liu-Trujillo.

The literary program will also feature “And Lester Swam On,” written by second graders at the John D. Philbrick School and illustrated by Cody Van Winkle. “Lester” is the first picture book published by 826 Boston, the nonprofit writing and literacy organization based in the Square.

The works selected for the program, now in its second summer, include: “Drum Dream Girl: How One Girl’s Courage Changed Music” by Margarita Engle, illustrated by Rafael López; “Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat” by Javaka Steptoe, and more.

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Silver People: Voices from the Panama Canal by Margarita Engle 2015 Awardee

The Surrender Tree: Poems of Cuba’s Struggle for Freedom by Margarita Engle 2009 Awardee

Hot Day on Abbott Avenue by Karen English, with collage art of Javaka Steptoe 2005 Awardee


A Fun, New Vacation-Worthy Picture Book Crop for Preschoolers

Hannah Sparkles: A Friend Through Rain or Shine
By Robin Mellom; illustrated by Vanessa Brantley-Newton; HarperCollins

Hannah Sparkles: A Friend Through Rain or Shine is a fun, sparkly tale is gleefully illustrated and written with zest and love.

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We Shall Overcome: The Story of a Song written by Debbie Levy, illustrated by Vanessa Brantley-Newton 2014 Awardee


This week in W.Va. history

Aug. 12, 1937: Author Walter Dean Myers was born in Martinsburg. In January 2012, Myers was named the National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature by the Library of Congress.

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Now Is Your Time! The African-American Struggle for Freedom by Walter Dean Myers 1992 Awardee

Patrol: An American Soldier in Vietnam by Walter Dean Myers 2003 Awardee


Essay: When literature turns East

A long time ago, foreigners were generally interested only in exotic Indonesian novels written by Pramoedya Ananta Toer, Ahmad Tohari, Iwan Simatupang and YB Mangunwijaya. The current trend is the other way around. Andrea Hirata’s bestselling 2005 semiautobiographical novel, Laskar Pelangi (Rainbow Warriors), won the General Fiction Category at the 2013 New York Book Festival.

The turn-to-East inclination of literature is also visible as many travelers and migrant authors write about other countries. Take, for example, the case of I am Malala by Christina Lamb and My Name is Parvana by Deborah Ellis. Christina Lamb is a British journalist and novelist who lived in Pakistan and Afghanistan and Deborah Ellis is a Canadian who also lived in both countries.

I am Malala is about a girl, a victim of Taliban atrocities in Pakistan, while My Name is Parvana is about a girl, also a victim of Taliban atrocities, in Afghanistan. Applying a comparative approach, the findings will be the same: the cruelty to children committed by the Taliban in Pakistan from the point of view of a British author and a Canadian author.

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The Heaven Shop by Deborah Ellis 2005 Awardee

The Breadwinner Trilogy, three books by Deborah Ellis 2004 Awardee

Parvana’s Journey by Deborah Ellis 2003 Awardee


Library Announces Complete Lineup of Authors for 2017 National Book Festival

Children’s Purple Stage: Mike Curato, Emma Donoghue, Cynthia Levinson and Sanford Levinson, Shelia P. Moses, Kadir Nelson, Dav Pilkey, Nathaniel Philbrick, Sherri Duskey Rinker and John Rocco, Madelyn Rosenberg and Wendy Wan-Long Shang, Rachel Renee Russell and Nikki Russell, Reshma Saujani, Ronald L. Smith, Javaka Steptoe.

Children’s Green Stage: Letters About Literature: A Book That Shaped Me summer writing contest, Kelly Barnhill, Michael Buckley, Carmen Agra Deedy, Kate DiCamillo, Travis Foster and Ethan Long, Jack Gantos, Amy Sarig King, Verónica Murguía, Ellen Oh with Kwame Alexander, Meg Medina and Tim Tingle, R.J. Palacio, Cokie Roberts, Chris Van Dusen.

Teens Stage: Kwame Alexander and Mary Rand Hess, M.T. Anderson, David Baldacci, Falling in Love panel (Melissa de la Cruz, Sandhya Menon and Nicola Yoon), Growing Up is Hard panel (Kathleen Glasgow and Angie Thomas), Marie Lu, Andrew McCarthy, Tanya Lee Stone, Sabaa Tahir. The stage will close with a poetry slam.

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We’ve Got a Job: The 1963 Birmingham Children’s March by Cynthia Levinson 2013 Awardee

Heart and Soul: The Story of America and African Americans written and illustrated by Kadir Nelson 2012 Awardee

The Village That Vanished written by Ann Grifalconi and illustrated by Kadir Nelson 2003 Awardee

Hot Day on Abbott Avenue by Karen English, with collage art of Javaka Steptoe 2005 Awardee

The Yellow Star: The Legend of King Christian X of Denmark by Carmen Agra Deedy 2001 Awardee

Crossing Bok Chitto: told in written form by nationally recognized Choctaw storyteller Tim Tingle 2007 Awardee

Almost Astronauts: 13 Women Who Dared to Dream by Tanya Lee Stone 2010 Awardee


Choctaw author Tim Tingle offers presentation at Technology Camp

Tim Tingle, an award-winning Choctaw author, emphasizes a point Friday at the inaugural EdCampSE hosted by Southeastern Oklahoma State University. The event provided an opportunity for educators (Pre-K-12 and beyond) to network and learn best practices on how to incorporate technology into the classroom. Southeastern, in partnership with the Masonic Institute for Professional Development, was able to offer the camp at no charge to participants.

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Crossing Bok Chitto: told in written form by nationally recognized Choctaw storyteller Tim Tingle 2007 Awardee


Mitali Perkins and more in August Notes

Check out the August edition of Notes from the Horn Book newsletter to find 5Q for author Mitali Perkins on her new, generation-spanning YA novel, You Bring the Distant Near.

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Rickshaw Girl by Mitali Perkins, illustrations by Jamie Hogan 2008 Awardee


We know it’s early. But here are the books you should be reading this fall

“Future Home of the Living God,” Louise Erdrich (Harper): Winner of the National Book Award for “The Round House,” Erdrich has spent her career weaving stories around the fascinating people of an Ojibwe reservation in Minnesota (we loved her last novel, “LaRose,” to distraction). Now she turns her hand to a dystopian novel about a young mother-to-be in a world in which women are giving birth to a primitive species. If that plot doesn’t give you chills, nothing will. Out Nov. 14.

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The Birchbark House by Louise Erdrich 2000 Awardee


If You Want to Know What It’s Like to Die, Ask Writers: Book Review Non Fiction

It is a moving portrait and a vivid illustration of one of the author’s key points. “We write about the dead to make sense of our losses,” she writes, “to become less haunted, to turn ghosts into words, to transform an absence into language.”

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Mama’s Nightingale: A Story of Immigration and Separation written by Edwidge Danticat, illustrated by Leslie Staub 2016 Awardee


These Latino Artists and Entrepreneurs Are Transforming Fresno, California

Fresno has been cultivating an artistic vibe that has drawn and encouraged new and interesting businesses.

Behind these changes are many Latino artists and entrepreneurs. They’re making an impact in downtown Fresno, an area that’s seen a flurry of activity since 2013, when the city made its big push to revitalize it.

Fresno is known as the birthplace of many famous writers, from William Saroyan to former U.S. Poet Laureate Juan Felipe Herrera. Other Latino literary giants from Fresno include Gary Soto and Margarita Engle, a Cuban American young adult writer from Clovis, an area in Fresno County.

Engle is the author of “The Surrender Tree: Poems of Cuba’s Struggle for Freedom,” a Newberry Honor winner, as well as “The Lightning Dreamer: Cuba’s Greatest Abolitionist”, a PEN USA Award winner. She recently became the first Hispanic to be named the nation’s Young People’s Poet Laureate.

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Silver People: Voices from the Panama Canal by Margarita Engle 2015 Awardee

The Surrender Tree: Poems of Cuba’s Struggle for Freedom by Margarita Engle 2009 Awardee


Jacqueline Woodson Discusses “Another Brooklyn,” Jazz, and Friendship

WBGO Reporter Naomi Brauner spoke with critically acclaimed author Jacqueline Woodson to discuss life as an author, parenting, jazz, and her most recent book, Another Brooklyn.

Woodson spoke to the importance of representation in literature: representing black fatherhood, black Muslims, and Bushwick in the 1970s.

Listen [here] to Naomi’s extended web interview with Woodson.

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Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by E.B. Lewis 2013 Awardee

From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun by Jacqueline Woodson 1996 Awardee

I Hadn’t Meant to Tell You This by Jacqueline Woodson 1995 Awardee

The Jane Addams Children’s Book Award annually recognizes children’s books of literary and aesthetic excellence that effectively engage children in thinking about peace, social justice, global community, and equity for all people.

Read more about the 2017 Awards.

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