Jane Addams Award Winning Author Jacqueline Woodson Wins the World’s Largest Prize for Children’s Literature #JACBA Newsletter
Newsletter / April 14, 2018

Special Announcement April 30th: Video announcement and press release made public Watch this space for a special announcement regarding the announcement of this year’s Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winners and Honorees! Jacqueline Woodson wins the world’s largest prize for children’s literature, the Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award Jacqueline Woodson, who won a National Book Award for her memoir in verse “Brown Girl Dreaming,” won the 2018 Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award on Tuesday. Woodson is the 18th person or organization to win the prize, which is considered one of the most prestigious children’s literary awards in the world. Woodson becomes the fourth American author to win the Lindgren Award, after Maurice Sendak, Katherine Paterson and Meg Rosoff, an American-born writer who has lived in the United Kingdom for several years. The award was accompanied by a citation from the jury who selected Woodson, which reads, “Jacqueline Woodson introduces us to resilient young people fighting to find a place where their lives can take root. In language as light as air, she tells stories of resounding richness and depth. Jacqueline Woodson captures a unique poetic note in a daily reality divided between sorrow and hope.” Read More Each Kindness written by Jacqueline…

Honoring The Life of Prolific Youth Nonfiction Writer Russell Freedman #JACBA Newsletter
Newsletter / April 6, 2018

Special Announcement April 30th: Video announcement and press release made public Watch this space for a special announcement regarding the announcement of this year’s Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winners and Honorees! Celebrate The Life of Prolific Youth Nonfiction Writer Russell Freedman With His Books The youth literature world lost a giant last week. Russell Freedman, author of roughly 50 books for young readers, died on Friday, March 16, 2018, at the age of 88. “I write for anyone who can read…up to senility. A good book for kids is also a good book for their parents and grandparents. If my grown-up friends cannot read one of my books with interest and respect, then it’s not a good book for kids.” -Russell Freedman Read More We Will Not Be Silent: The White Rose Student Resistance Movement That Defied Adolf Hitler by Russell Freedman 2017 Awardee Freedom Walkers by Russell Freedman 2007 Awardee Kids at Work: Lewis Hine and the Crusade Against Child Labor by Russell Freedman 1995 Awardee Eleanor Roosevelt: A Life of Discovery by Russell Freedman 1994 Awardee This 1951 Student Strike Laid the Groundwork for Brown v. Board of Education Nearly 70 years before Emma González became one…

Faith Ringgold’s Art Frees Absent and Buried Voices #JACBA Newsletter
Newsletter / March 25, 2018

Special Announcement April 30th: Video announcement and press release made public Watch this space for a special announcement regarding the announcement of this year’s Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winners and Honorees! Faith Ringgold Faith Ringgold’s famous ‘story quilts’ come to the Crocker Artist, activist and author Faith Ringgold works in many media – painting, drawing, prints, sculpture, masks and Tankas (painted fabrics inspired by Tibetan textiles) – but she is best known for her vibrant “story quilts” that deal with family life, jazz music, relationships, race and slavery in America. Read More POWER IN THE PAINTING: FAITH RINGGOLD AND HER STORY QUILTS Through this didactic retelling of history, Faith Ringgold uses her quilts to reframe the past, freeing absent and buried voices while offering new and stronger voices to future generations. Read More Aunt Harriet’s Underground Railroad in the Sky by Faith Ringgold 1993 Awardee Five questions for Winifred Conkling Like it or not, the women’s movement was divided by racism in the nineteenth century. The issue needs to be openly discussed because it happened. It’s also important that young readers learn to appreciate their heroines as flawed and complex human beings. Read More Sylvia & Aki by Winifred…

Books for Every Girl During Women’s History Month #JACBA Newsletter
Newsletter / March 19, 2018

Women’s History Month 32 books every little girl should read during Women’s History Month From the women who wanted to go to the stars, to women who wanted to save the earth. From women who wanted to vote, to women who wanted to judge. From women who wanted to be doctors, to women who wanted to take the stage. This list is filled with fun stories that are sure to leave a lasting impression on your little one’s imagination even beyond Women’s History Month. Read More The struggle for women’s rights and other lessons for young readers Many young readers might rightfully wonder: How could it possibly have taken until 1920 for women to win the right to vote? Two new books make clear how fierce the struggle was, exploring how generations of female activists challenged women’s inferior status and faced derision, physical attacks and (in the 1910s) lengthy imprisonment. Read More Young adult lit roundup: ‘Votes for Women!’ and two novels-in-verse reviewed Still, it gives hope that, no matter how broken the system, no matter much our beliefs seem to divide us, change can happen. Read More 10 Amazing Facts About Suffrage to Remember on International Women’s Day Author…

History will be kinder to student organizers of walkout than their critics #JACBA Newsletter
Newsletter / March 13, 2018

History will be kinder to student organizers of walkout than their critics In Phillip Hoose’s book, “Claudette Colvin: Twice Toward Justice,” Colvin recounts her fear of reprisals for her activism, although it was the armed Klan she worried about, not a college rejection letter. Her words should inspire Georgia teens facing pressure to remain silent. “But worried or not, I felt proud. I had stood up for our rights. I had done something a lot of adults hadn’t done.” Read More Hey, Little Ant by Phillip and Hannah Hoose 1999 Awardee Claudette Colvin by Phillip Hoose 2010 Awardee She Walked the Walk: How Barbara Johns Continues to Inspire Us This Black History Month we remember the life, the courage, and the sacrifice of Barbara Rose Johns. Her actions inspire us to keep walking the walk, just like she did. Read More The Girl From the Tar Paper School: Barbara Rose Johns and the advent of the Civil Rights Movement by Teri Kanefield 2015 Awardee We Asked for Your Favorite Hidden Figures From Black History. Your Responses Were Powerful. “First she liberated herself by registering to vote, and then she helped to liberate others by spreading that message and recruiting others…

Oscar nominee The Breadwinner (based on the Jane Addams book) Echoes A Broader Shift to Cultural Diversity in Film #JACBA Newsletter 02Mar2018
Newsletter / March 5, 2018

How Two Nominees for Best Animated Feature Found the Right Sound Academy Award winner Angelina Jolie put her producing muscle behind The Breadwinner, Irish filmmaker Nora Twomey’s adaptation of Deborah Ellis’s 2000 best-selling young-adult novel about an 11-year-old Afghan girl. The film is voiced almost entirely by relatively unknown Afghan actors…. Read More The Heaven Shop by Deborah Ellis 2005 Awardee The Breadwinner Trilogy, three books by Deborah Ellis 2004 Awardee Parvana’s Journey by Deborah Ellis 2003 Awardee Drawing Black History: 4 Children’s Book Illustrators Show Us How Maria Russo: And the author is Cynthia Levinson, who is a fantastic historian for children. She writes for children, but I learn from her books. Every one of them teaches me, too. Also features Vanessa Brantley-Newton, Bryan Collier, Carole Boston Weatehrford, and R. Gregory Christie. Read More We’ve Got a Job: The 1963 Birmingham Children’s March by Cynthia Levinson 2013 Awardee We Shall Overcome: The Story of a Song written by Debbie Levy, illustrated by Vanessa Brantley-Newton 2014 Awardee Martin’s Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. written by Doreen Rappaport with artwork by Bryan Collier 2002 Awardee The Book Itch: Freedom, Truth & Harlem’s Greatest Bookstore by Vaunda…

Addams Author Eloise Greenfied is 2018 Coretta Scott King-Virginia Hamilton Award #JACBA Newsletter 23Feb2018
Newsletter / February 25, 2018

The Coretta Scott King Book Awards Eloise Greenfield is the recipient of the 2018 Coretta Scott King-Virginia Hamilton Award for Lifetime Achievement. “Eloise Greenfield is a trailblazer whose extraordinary books of poetry and prose have influenced many and continue to resonate with children today. Her rich body of work inspires and enriches readers,” said Award Committee Chair Deborah D. Taylor. Read More Paul Robeson by Eloise Greenfield 1976 Awardee UC San Diego exhibition features work by 7 leading international women The seven artists – Eleanor Antin, Barbara Kruger, Faith Ringgold, Martha Rosler, Miriam … Substantiate Our Horror" (1985), Faith Ringgold’s hand-stenciled quilt “Seven Passages to a Flight”… Presented together for the first time, seven internationally recognized artists are featured in the UC San Diego exhibition “Stories That We Tell: Art and Identity,” celebrating those who paved the way for greater inclusion by inventing new means to address issues of race and gender. The seven artists – Eleanor Antin, Barbara Kruger, Faith Ringgold, Martha Rosler, Miriam Schapiro, Lorna Simpson and Carrie Mae Weems – have all been honored with major exhibitions at leading museums, recognized with prestigious awards and are all representative of the university’s Department of Visual Arts. Read More…

Jacqueline Woodson, newly named 2018 Wilder Winner, Calls for the End of the Label “Struggling Reader” #JACBA Newsletter 16Feb2018
Newsletter / February 18, 2018

Stop Using the Label ‘Struggling Reader,’ Author Jacqueline Woodson Advises Woodson: Any kind of qualifier can be harmful because who we are is not static. Our abilities are constantly changing. What does it mean to be a struggling reader? I know if I was raised in this day and age, I would have been labeled a struggling reader. But what I know now is I was actually reading like a writer. I was reading slowly and deliberately and deconstructing language, not in the sense of looking up words in the dictionary, but understanding from context. I was constantly being compared to my sister who excelled, and it made me feel insecure. What gets translated is ‘you are not as good,’ and that gets translated into our whole bodies. That’s where the danger lies. Read More Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by E.B. Lewis 2013 Awardee From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun by Jacqueline Woodson 1996 Awardee I Hadn’t Meant to Tell You This by Jacqueline Woodson 1995 Awardee ALA Awards: Jacqueline Woodson wins 2018 Wilder Award Jacqueline Woodson is the winner of the 2018 Laura Ingalls Wilder Award honoring an author or illustrator, published in the United States,…

Black History Celebrated Through Biographies and Much More #JACBA Newsletter 9Feb2018
Newsletter / February 11, 2018

Children’s Books About Black History, Heavy on Biographies Among that genre’s newest arrivals are names familiar to adults, as in THE UNITED STATES V. JACKIE ROBINSON (HarperCollins/Balzer + Bray, ages 4 to 8), written by Sudipta Bardhan-Quallen. This picture book is more interested in young Robinson’s less-known act of resistance during his Army days than in his later, trailblazing career as a baseball player. It’s nice to have an athlete celebrated for personal integrity over physical prowess, and R. Gregory Christie’s pictures bolster this, evoking a Robinson who is strong and sure, but also smiling, warm, and ultimately, triumphant. Sandra Neil Wallace’s BETWEEN THE LINES: How Ernie Barnes Went From the Football Field to the Art Gallery (Simon & Schuster/Paula Wiseman, ages 4 to 8), illustrated by Bryan Collier, is a beautiful testament to a quintessentially American life. Wallace and Collier celebrate both Barnes’s success on the gridiron and his subsequent reinvention as an artist. As in “The United States v. Jackie Robinson,” athleticism is a secondary concern; early on, we see the young Barnes in a museum, wondering where the black painters are, and the story ends with contemporary young museumgoers being shown Barnes’s art. This choice makes the…

In Washington DC: disrupting the notion of what public education and what black boys can do and be #JACBA Newsletter 2Feb2018
Newsletter / February 4, 2018

These kids started a book club for minority boys. It’s the most popular club in school. The club dates back to December, when a fifth-grader complained one morning that his lackluster results on a citywide English exam didn’t reflect his true reading abilities. The principal, Mary Ann Stinson, placed a book she had lying around – “Bad Boy: A Memoir,” by Walter Dean Myers – in his hands and told him to start reading. The boys quickly became engrossed in the 2001 book about Myers’s childhood in New York’s Harlem. The club’s sponsor and the boys meet once or twice a week at 8:15 a.m. – a half-hour before the first bell rings – and use the book to launch into conversations about their own experiences with race, identity and adolescence. “It’s a blessing to be in this predicament, to have kids who are becoming ravenous readers,” Redmond said. “We’re disrupting the notion of what public education can be and what little black boys can do and be.” Read More Now Is Your Time! The African-American Struggle for Freedom by Walter Dean Myers 1992 Awardee Patrol: An American Soldier in Vietnam by Walter Dean Myers 2003 Awardee ‘Monster’ Review: Powerful…