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Illustrated Books About Women Who Changed The World #JACBA Newsletter 28Jul2017
Newsletter / July 29, 2017

14 Illustrated Books About Women Who Changed The World ‘Girls Think of Everything: Stories of Ingenious Inventions by Women’ by Catherine Thimmesh and Melissa Sweet (Illustrator) Women have invented some pretty amazing things throughout history – you just didn’t know it. Girls Think of Everything is a smart collection of stories, each with a compelling voice that makes you feel part of the stories themselves. ‘Hillary Rodham Clinton: Dreams Taking Flight’ by Kathleen Krull and Amy June Bates (Illustrator) If you have a thing for books that tell the stories of inspiring female politicians, look no futher: Kathleen Krull and Amy June Bates’ account of Hillary Clinton’s life will take you on an inspired journey through her younger years. ‘Me, Frida’ by Amy Novesky and David Díaz (Illustrator) Connect with the life of Frida Kahlo with this playful, poetic and mesmerizing book, styled after Frida’s artwork. Written by Amy Novesky and illustrated by David Diaz, this book tells the tale of her early days in San Francisco with her husband, the artist Diego Rivera. Frida struggled to find a muse, speak a foreign language, and learn to live a life that didn’t yet belong to her, but once she did,…

LBGT Lambda Literary Awards and Pride Book List #JACBA Newsletter 30Jun2017
Newsletter / July 1, 2017

LGBTQ Women of Color Win Big at Lambda Literary Awards Nine women of color took home prizes at this year’s 29th Annual Lambda Literary Awards. With 24 categories in all, ranging from “LGBT Science Fiction/Fantasy/Horror” to “Transgender Poetry,” the event celebrated 13 writers of color and 16 women. The Lambda Literary Awards, also known as the “Lammys,” honors books written by writers in the LGBTQ community. One of the evening’s most prestigious awards, the Visionary Award, went to Jacqueline Woodson. The author of the 2014 New York Times bestselling memoir “Brown Girl Dreaming” received the award to commemorate her lifetime achievements. Tony Award-winning actress Cynthia Nixon introduced Woodson, declaring her a “writer who is part of the institution but stands outside it and critiques.” Nixon also said Woodson is “the writer, the friend, the citizen these times demand.” Read More Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by E.B. Lewis 2013 Awardee From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun by Jacqueline Woodson 1996 Awardee I Hadn’t Meant to Tell You This by Jacqueline Woodson 1995 Awardee Award-winning children’s author comes to new Open Book/Open Mind Series event Newbery and National Book Award-winning children’s author Jacqueline Woodson will be the next guest…

Inspired Feminist Children’s Books On the Rise #JACBA Newsletter 1Jun2017
Newsletter / June 4, 2017

15 Feminist Children’s Books That Will Inspire Readers Of Any Age Girls Think of Everything: Stories of Ingenious Inventions by Women by Catherine Thimmesh and Melissa Sweet tells the stories of the women who invented everything from windshield wipers, to liquid paper white-out, to aircraft bumpers, to the chocolate chip cookie, and more. I Dissent: Ruth Bader Ginsburg Makes Her Mark by Debbie Levy and Elizabeth Baddeley tells the (condensed, simplified) version of the amazing life and achievements of Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, while combating the idea that young girls and women should always be agreeable, accommodating, and non-confrontational – a lesson I know that at least I need to keep learning over and over. The Invisible Princess by Faith Ringgold is an African American fairy tale set during slavery, telling the story of one couple whose wishes for their child come true in ways they never could have imagined. That daughter becomes the Invisible Princess, who will one day liberate her parents from slavery, and bring freedom to all the slaves on the plantation. This one is a great reminder of the difference just one individual can make – invisible or not. Read More Brave Girl: Clara…

Rewriting the Narrative In a World With No Fairy Tale Endings: J. Woodson At Teachers College #JACBA Newsletter 26May2017
Newsletter / May 27, 2017

Rewriting the Narrative: At TC’s first master’s degree ceremony, a focus on civic education as an antidote to a world with no fairytale endings Speaking after Fuhrman, the National Book Award-winning writer Jacqueline Woodson – author of the memoir-in-verse Brown Girl Dreaming, the novels Locomotion and Feathers, and other titles for young adults and children – remarked on the moment in children’s literature when “the stories change to tales where there is no longer a happy ending” and where suddenly “no perfectly fitted glass slipper brings about a happily ever after, no straw spun to gold defeats Rumpelstiltskin, no pea beneath a mattress ends in some hetero-normative, very white world of marriage and Queendom.” NO GLASS SLIPPER Woodson spoke of the need to prepare young people to work for change in a world with no fairy-tale endings. Woodson recalled a school appearance at which she read the bittersweet ending to one of her books, only to have a third grade boy stand up, enraged, and tell her that the characters were supposed to become friends. “You will face again and again the enraged boy who doesn’t think the story should end this way,” she told graduates. “And you will agree…

Remembering the Jewish Holocaust and Armenian Genocide: Never Again for Anyone, Anywhere #JACBA Newsletter 5May2017
Newsletter / May 6, 2017

Holocaust Remembrance Day reminds us that vigilance must be constant Many of our schoolchildren read about the Holocaust in books like Lois Lowry’s “Number the Stars,” Anne Frank’s “The Diary of a Young Girl” and Elie Wiesel’s “Night.” We’re generations away from the Holocaust now, and that distance may be muting the horror for those whose family members weren’t touched by it. We cannot allow this to happen. Forgetting has terrible consequences. “The impact of direct education from survivors is huge,” Miriam Baumgartner of the Jewish Community Alliance of Lancaster, told LNP. “Putting teenagers in a room with a survivor – there is no experience like it. And it doesn’t happen very much anymore.” Read More Number the Stars written by Lois Lowry 1990 Awardee Remembering the Armenian Genocide Through Survivor Memoirs and Historical Novels A growing number of Diaspora writers sought to explore their roots and tell of their fellow Armenians’ tragic fate. David Kherdian outlines his mother’s life in The Road from Home: The Story of an Armenian Girl (1979). The different generations of memoirs and historical novels on the Armenian Genocide reveal the ongoing suffering of Armenians throughout the world. The genocide has become a key defining…

Announcing 2017 Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winning and Honor Titles
Award Announcements , Newsletter / April 28, 2017

Announcement of the 2017 Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winners Congratulations to the 65th Jane Addams Children’s Book Awardees Deborah Hopkinson, Ron Husband, Debbie Levy, Elizabeth Baddeley, Susan E Goodman, E.B. Lewis, Caren B. Stelson, Russell Freedman, and Lauren Wolk. Press Release Word and PDF Video Announcement The Jane Addams Model Our antipoverty efforts tend to be systematized and bureaucratized, but Hull House was intensely personalistic. She sought to change the world by planting herself deeply in a particular neighborhood. She treated each person as a unique soul. Read More Sonic Spirituality: Louise Erdrich on Postcommodity’s Ceremonial Transformation of LRAD The effect of LRAD, Long Range Acoustic Device, on people is devastating. But in a moving act of cultural transformation, the art collective Postcommodity is using LRAD in a radically different manner. The innocuous-looking gray LRAD speakers are installed in Athens, Greece, and the more softly pitched acoustical beam is directed at the archeological site of Aristotle’s Lyceum. Here, LRAD is used to speak to the origins of western civilization, not in weaponized tones, but in the language of the human spirit. Postcommodity’s work is to heal that damage, to inflict, instead of pain and loss, complexity, meaning, and gorgeous…

Jane Addams Winner Lynda Blackmon Lowery’s Civil Rights Story Speaks to Syrian Refugees #JACBA Newsletter 14Apr2017
Newsletter / April 14, 2017

April 28th, 8:00am CST: Video announcement and press release made public Watch this space for a special announcement regarding the announcement of this year’s Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winners and Honorees! Civil rights marcher inspires Syrian refugee students in Bay Ridge Inspiring figure: Lynda Blackmon Lowery, the youngest participant to march from Selma to Montgomery, Ala., with Martin Luther King Jr., shared her story with students at Mary White Ovington elementary and middle school in Bay Ridge on March 27. And her story was particularly inspiring to Syrian refugees at the school, said one student whose family fled that war torn country. “The refugees need to live in a safe country just like Lynda Lowery,” said second-grader Rayan Alrahawan. “So I will fight for the refugees [so] the children can go to school and the families can go to work.” Students drew parallels to Lowery’s struggles and their own as refugees – with one student emphasizing the importance of basic human rights in an illustrated letter to Lowery. “Without freedom, I can’t do anything,” said second-grader Layan Nakawh, who is also a refugee. “In my country, Syria, the kids can not go to school. They have nothing. I hope…