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Speaking Truth, Beautifully, to Shattered Young People with Poetry #JACBA Newsletter
Newsletter / April 29, 2018

Special Announcement April 30th: Video announcement and press release made public Watch this space for a special announcement regarding the announcement of this year’s Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winners and Honorees! Speaking Truth, Beautifully, to Shattered Young People Naomi Shihab Nye reminds our “obsessively tuned in” culture of the magic, power and necessity of “quiet inspiration.” She reminds us that the more “connected” we’ve become, the more disconnected we actually are: “With so much vying for our attention,” she asks, “how do we listen better?” Read More Habibi by Naomi Shihab Nye 1998 Awardee Sitti’s Secrets by Naomi Shihab Nye, illustrated by Nancy Carpenter 1995 Awardee April 2018 Horn Book Herald: Spring News: Five questions for Margarita Engle Most of the poetry written for young readers is straightforward and easy to understand, but it’s meant to be experienced, not dissected. Instead of asking yourself, “What did the poet mean?” ask, “How does this poem make me feel?” Read More Silver People: Voices from the Panama Canal by Margarita Engle 2015 Awardee The Surrender Tree: Poems of Cuba’s Struggle for Freedom by Margarita Engle 2009 Awardee Q & A with Jewell Parker Rhodes In her latest novel for middle-grade readers,…

In Washington DC: disrupting the notion of what public education and what black boys can do and be #JACBA Newsletter 2Feb2018
Newsletter / February 4, 2018

These kids started a book club for minority boys. It’s the most popular club in school. The club dates back to December, when a fifth-grader complained one morning that his lackluster results on a citywide English exam didn’t reflect his true reading abilities. The principal, Mary Ann Stinson, placed a book she had lying around – “Bad Boy: A Memoir,” by Walter Dean Myers – in his hands and told him to start reading. The boys quickly became engrossed in the 2001 book about Myers’s childhood in New York’s Harlem. The club’s sponsor and the boys meet once or twice a week at 8:15 a.m. – a half-hour before the first bell rings – and use the book to launch into conversations about their own experiences with race, identity and adolescence. “It’s a blessing to be in this predicament, to have kids who are becoming ravenous readers,” Redmond said. “We’re disrupting the notion of what public education can be and what little black boys can do and be.” Read More Now Is Your Time! The African-American Struggle for Freedom by Walter Dean Myers 1992 Awardee Patrol: An American Soldier in Vietnam by Walter Dean Myers 2003 Awardee ‘Monster’ Review: Powerful…

You’re invited to the 2017 JACBA Ceremony in person & streaming online!
Newsletter / October 13, 2017

You’re Invited! October 20, 2017 2:30PM Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Ceremony PDF | JPG ——————————————- Humans had to evolve to acknowledge octopus consciousness “An octopus is as different from a person physically as creatures can get,” naturalist Sy Montgomery, author of the 2015 book The Soul of an Octopus, … Read More Getting to Know Sy Montgomery Getting to Know Sy Montgomery. Do you think of writing children’s books as a “desk job”? Well, there is some sitting and writing involved but there is so … Read More Sandwich Reads Together To Focus On ‘The Soul Of An Octopus’ Written by author and naturalist Sy Montgomery, it explores the physical world of the octopus and the connections it makes with humans. By turns … Read More Temple Grandin: How the Girl Who Loved Cows Embraced Autism and Changed the World by Sy Montgomery 2013 Awardee 8 Things That Happen In Kids’ Brains When Arts Funding Gets Cut Children’s book author and professor Jewell Parker Rhodes knows firsthand how a lack of emphasis on creativity can stymie emotional expression… Read More Sugar by Jewell Parker Rhodes 2014 Awardee The Ninth Ward by Jewell Parker Rhodes 2011 Awardee Reading & literacy:…

Illustrated Books About Women Who Changed The World #JACBA Newsletter 28Jul2017
Newsletter / July 29, 2017

14 Illustrated Books About Women Who Changed The World ‘Girls Think of Everything: Stories of Ingenious Inventions by Women’ by Catherine Thimmesh and Melissa Sweet (Illustrator) Women have invented some pretty amazing things throughout history – you just didn’t know it. Girls Think of Everything is a smart collection of stories, each with a compelling voice that makes you feel part of the stories themselves. ‘Hillary Rodham Clinton: Dreams Taking Flight’ by Kathleen Krull and Amy June Bates (Illustrator) If you have a thing for books that tell the stories of inspiring female politicians, look no futher: Kathleen Krull and Amy June Bates’ account of Hillary Clinton’s life will take you on an inspired journey through her younger years. ‘Me, Frida’ by Amy Novesky and David Díaz (Illustrator) Connect with the life of Frida Kahlo with this playful, poetic and mesmerizing book, styled after Frida’s artwork. Written by Amy Novesky and illustrated by David Diaz, this book tells the tale of her early days in San Francisco with her husband, the artist Diego Rivera. Frida struggled to find a muse, speak a foreign language, and learn to live a life that didn’t yet belong to her, but once she did,…

LBGT Lambda Literary Awards and Pride Book List #JACBA Newsletter 30Jun2017
Newsletter / July 1, 2017

LGBTQ Women of Color Win Big at Lambda Literary Awards Nine women of color took home prizes at this year’s 29th Annual Lambda Literary Awards. With 24 categories in all, ranging from “LGBT Science Fiction/Fantasy/Horror” to “Transgender Poetry,” the event celebrated 13 writers of color and 16 women. The Lambda Literary Awards, also known as the “Lammys,” honors books written by writers in the LGBTQ community. One of the evening’s most prestigious awards, the Visionary Award, went to Jacqueline Woodson. The author of the 2014 New York Times bestselling memoir “Brown Girl Dreaming” received the award to commemorate her lifetime achievements. Tony Award-winning actress Cynthia Nixon introduced Woodson, declaring her a “writer who is part of the institution but stands outside it and critiques.” Nixon also said Woodson is “the writer, the friend, the citizen these times demand.” Read More Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by E.B. Lewis 2013 Awardee From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun by Jacqueline Woodson 1996 Awardee I Hadn’t Meant to Tell You This by Jacqueline Woodson 1995 Awardee Award-winning children’s author comes to new Open Book/Open Mind Series event Newbery and National Book Award-winning children’s author Jacqueline Woodson will be the next guest…

Jane Addams Winner Lynda Blackmon Lowery’s Civil Rights Story Speaks to Syrian Refugees #JACBA Newsletter 14Apr2017
Newsletter / April 14, 2017

April 28th, 8:00am CST: Video announcement and press release made public Watch this space for a special announcement regarding the announcement of this year’s Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winners and Honorees! Civil rights marcher inspires Syrian refugee students in Bay Ridge Inspiring figure: Lynda Blackmon Lowery, the youngest participant to march from Selma to Montgomery, Ala., with Martin Luther King Jr., shared her story with students at Mary White Ovington elementary and middle school in Bay Ridge on March 27. And her story was particularly inspiring to Syrian refugees at the school, said one student whose family fled that war torn country. “The refugees need to live in a safe country just like Lynda Lowery,” said second-grader Rayan Alrahawan. “So I will fight for the refugees [so] the children can go to school and the families can go to work.” Students drew parallels to Lowery’s struggles and their own as refugees – with one student emphasizing the importance of basic human rights in an illustrated letter to Lowery. “Without freedom, I can’t do anything,” said second-grader Layan Nakawh, who is also a refugee. “In my country, Syria, the kids can not go to school. They have nothing. I hope…