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RHYTHM, WORDPLAY, AND CREATIVITY – POETRY FOR LITERACY & LANGUAGE AQUISITION
Newsletter / April 7, 2019

50 MUST-READ POETRY BOOKS FOR KIDS The rhythm, word play, and creativity in poetry books for kids make them the perfect companion to language acquisition and developing literacy skills. I remember as a child stealing poetry books off my mom’s bookshelves and performing the poems, relishing the way the words felt in my mouth. (Included in the list…) Jacqueline Woodson’s lyrical text (The Day You Begin) and Rafael López’s dazzling art reminds us that we all feel like outsiders sometimes-and how brave it is that we go forth anyway. And that sometimes, when we reach out and begin to share our stories, others will be happy to meet us halfway. READ MORE…   HOW POETRY CAN HELP KIDS GET TO COLLEGE K’myah is one of the students at Ann Visger Elementary School in River Rouge who participated in InsideOut Literary Arts’ In School Writer-in-Residence Program, in spring 2018. (Photo: Doug Coombe) Students in marginalized communities often struggle to relate to the people and texts they are asked to study; there is power in learning that highly-respected writers — such as Lucille Clifton, Francine J. Harris, Jamaal May and Naomi Shihab Nye — come from similar backgrounds and have used their own, unique…

American Association for the Advancement of Science Names Socially-Conscious ‘Iqbal and His Ingenious Idea’ Top Children’s Science Picture Book
Newsletter / January 27, 2019

WELLESLEY AUTHOR’S BOOK HAS KIDS COOKING WITH SOLAR POWER Wellesley author Elizabeth Suneby’s latest in a series of socially-conscious children’s book has just been recognized with an award from the American Association for the Advancement of Science as the top children’s science picture book. Iqbal and His Ingenious Idea: How a Science Project Helps One Family and the Planet, written by Elizabeth Suneby and illustrated by Rebecca Green, tells the story of a Bangladeshi boy who sets out to build a smoke-free solar cooker in light of the damage that cooking over indoor fire during the monsoon season is having on his family’s health. READ MORE… WILDLIFE COMES INSIDE FOR THIS YEAR’S EVERETT READS! PROGRAM “We have a solution,” she (Sy Montgomery) said. “It’s right in front of us. Each one of us can affect the solution — by what you buy, how you eat, what you drive, how you vote. “We owe those animals, to fight with every last bit of our strength for this glorious, green, vulnerable, sweet earth,” she said. READ MORE…   CHRISTOPHER MYERS’ MAKE ME A WORLD IMPRINT LAUNCHES THIS FALL “Discover a World Where Everything Is Possible,” the lead-in to the mission statement for Make…

‘WE ARE DISPLACED’ – MALALA CHAMPIONS GIRL REFUGEES EVERYWHERE
Newsletter / January 20, 2019

IN HER NEW BOOK, MALALA CHAMPIONS THE REFUGEE CAUSE Malala’s new book, We are Displaced, goes beyond just her story. She speaks about many others who are just as heroic as her, but will never know fame. She also touches upon an issue that may be unpopular, but which needs to be said: “Many people think refugees should feel only two things: gratitude to the countries that granted them asylum, and relief in safety. I don’t think most people understand the tangle of emotions that comes with leaving behind everything you know.” READ MORE… WE NEED DIVERSE BOOKS JUST ANNOUNCED THE 2019 WALTER DEAN MYERS AWARD WINNERS FOR OUTSTANDING CHILDREN’S LITERATURE The Walter Dean Myers Award, also known as “The Walter,” is named for prolific children’s and young adult author Walter Dean Myers — writer of classic children’s books including Monster — who was an early champion of diversity in children’s books. 2019 Walter Award, Teen Category: ‘The Poet X’ by Elizabeth Acevedo 2019 Walter Award, Younger Readers Category: ‘Ghost Boys’ by Jewell Parker Rhodes READ MORE…     ARTS REVIEW: CHILDREN’S BOOK ART RECALLS ROSA PARKS BUS INCIDENT IN ALABAMA In the dozens of children’s books he has illustrated, Floyd Cooper tells stories that are pertinent…

HONOR MARTIN LUTHER KING JR’S LIFE WITH YOUNG PEOPLE 
Newsletter / January 13, 2019

JANE ADDAMS CHILDREN’S BOOK AWARD TITLES ABOUT MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. READ MORE… READ MORE… READ MORE… THE BOOK SHELF: STELA BOWLES BEING THE CHANGE IN NEW BOOK ‘MY RIVER’ Bowles’s story caught the attention of author Anne Laurel Carter, who divides her time between Toronto and a home down the road from Bowles’s family in Upper LaHave. Written in Bowles’s voice, Carter captured her story in the book My River: Cleaning up the LaHave River (Formac Publishing). Published last fall, the book was released this month in the United States. READ MORE…   HARPERCOLLINS LAUNCHES CHILDREN’S BOOK PODCAST HarperCollins Children’s Books has announced the launch of Remember Reading?, a monthly podcast dedicated to classic and contemporary books for young readers. In each 30-minute episode, guests including journalists, educators, and award-winning authors will discuss the connections between beloved books from childhood and recent favorites, and the enduring appeal of children’s literature. June, Episode 6: Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson READ MORE… FAIRFIELD ANNOUNCES ONE BOOK ONE TOWN 2019 The Fairfield Public Library and its community partners — Pequot Library, Fairfield University and the Fairfield University Bookstore — announced two selections for One Book One Town (OBOT) for 2019 on Tuesday morning. The…

GO OUT OF YOUR WAY TO BE KIND
Newsletter / December 9, 2018

I’M YOUR NEIGHBOR: WELCOMING IMMIGRANTS, REFUGEES, AND MIGRANTS AS NEIGHBORS THROUGH THE SHARING OF CHILDREN’S LITERATURE AND OTHER STORIES FEATURING MALALA’S MAGIC PENCIL Malala’s first picture book will inspire young readers everywhere to find the magic all around them. This beautifully illustrated volume tells Malala’s story for a younger audience and shows them the worldview that allowed Malala to hold on to hope even in the most difficult of times. READ MORE… MALALA YOUSAFZAI WINS SECOND HARVARD ACTIVISM AWARD “Malala speaks powerfully to the strength and perseverance of women and girls who are oppressed,” said Gergen in The Harvard Gazette. “Her remarkable story has inspired girls — and boys as well — to follow in her footsteps and has activated a generation of practitioners and legislators who are fighting for equality in their own communities.” READ MORE… AUTHOR INSPIRES MAIN STREET SCHOOL STUDENTS TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE Main Street School fourth- and fifth-graders, who had been reading Amal Unbound, the story of a young Pakistani girl forced into indentured servitude as part of their Global School Read Aloud activities in October, welcomed the book’s author, Aisha Saeed… The book’s main character, Amal, was inspired by Malala Yousafzai, a Pakistani activist for female education and the…

WELL READ BLACK GIRL MAKES THE CASE FOR WHY REPRESENTATION IN LITERATURE CHANGES LIVES
Newsletter / October 7, 2018

JANE ADDAMS CHILDREN’S BOOK AWARD CEREMONY FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2018 AT 2:30 PM 777 UNITED NATIONS PLAZA FL 2 (44TH & 1ST) NEW YORK CITY, NEW YORK A memorable afternoon of award presentation and responses by authors and illustrators. Meet and talk with the honored guests, including Award winners and honorees. Enjoy a reception and an opportunity for book signing after formal presentation of the awards. All the award books will be available for purchase. This event is free and open to all. Reservations are not needed. Can’t come to NYC? Follow the ceremony as it is live streamed from https://www.facebook.com/pg/janeaddamspeace/posts/ _________________________________________ THE 10 BOOKS TO READ IN OCTOBER Edim’s Well-Read Black Girl online community is one of the best arguments for social media that exists. In this essay collection she has edited, we can see that it’s also necessary, with some of today’s finest writers — including Jesmyn Ward, Jacqueline Woodson and Tayari Jones — making the case for why representation in literature changes lives. READ MORE…   JACQUELINE WOODSON’S REAL MAKE-BELIEVE VISIT TO OAKLAND The celebrated author of the memoir “Brown Girl Dreaming,” Woodson will engage with young book lovers at Chapter 510 & the Dept. of Make Believe, the…

Lois Lowry sees childhood as exploratory, not idyllic.
Newsletter / September 2, 2018

LOIS LOWRY STILL THINKS KIDS NEED TO READ ABOUT TERRIBLE THINGS (AND SHE’S STILL RIGHT) There’s no heaviness, just certitude. Lois Lowry understands herself — a rare trait in a writer — which gives her an edge on understanding others…. She doesn’t think that the intrusion of ugly things — even death — ends childhood. She sees childhood as exploratory, not idyllic. READ MORE… _________________________________________ MOST DOWNLOADED PHOTOGRAPH IN THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS ARCHIVE COMES TO THE PIEDMONT TRIAD, AS REYNOLDA OPENS ‘DORTHEA LANGE’S AMERICA’ SEPT. 14 In “Dorothea Lange: The Photographer Who Found the Faces of the Depression,” Carole Boston Weatherford captures the spirit of Dorothea Lange with lyrical prose intended for children. Weatherford will read from her picture book biography and join in discussion with the audience. Enjoy music and hands-on activities while learning about “Dorothea Lange’s America.” READ MORE… _________________________________________ HOMEWORK QUESTIONS ON RACE, DRUGS, AND GUNS DRAW IRE FROM PARENTS A spokesperson for the school said in a statement, “The AF Brownsville Middle homework assignment drew directly from the text of Seedfolks – a widely acclaimed novel written by Newbery Medal winning author Paul Fleischman – that focuses on a diverse cast of characters, discusses racial themes, and…

GRAPHIC WORKS FOR YOUTH ON MIGRANTS, REFUGEES, HUMAN TRAFFICKING
Newsletter / August 5, 2018

GRAPHIC WORKS ON MIGRANTS, REFUGEES, HUMAN TRAFFICKING The story: In an accordion-style folded comic with drawings inspired by pre-Columbian art, Tonatiuh tells a fictional story of a Mexican laborer who enters the U.S. illegally and finds work as an underpaid and exploited busboy. He then tries to organize his co-workers demand better working conditions. The author: Tonatiuh is an acclaimed children’s book illustrator. READ MORE… __________________________________ ALICE B. MCGINTY/ARTFUL BIOGRAPHIES OF UNUSUAL ARTISTS In “The Secret Kingdom: Nek Chand, a Changing India, and a Hidden World of Art” (2018, Candlewick Press, written by Barb Rosenstock, illustrated by Claire A. Nivola, ages 5-12), flowing watercolor illustrations and bright, lyrical text bring us into the magical world of Nek Chand’s Indian village. READ MORE… EMMA’S POEM: THE VOICE OF THE STATUE OF LIBERTY BY LINDA GLASER & ILLUSTRATED BY CLAIRE A. NIVOLA __________________________________ ILLUSTRATIONS BY LULU DELACRE TO BE PRESENTED IN SONIA SOTOMAYOR’S LIFE STORY AT ZIMMERLI THIS FALL “In Turning Pages, she (Sonia Sotomayor) is a powerful advocate for the importance of reading, demonstrating how early exposure to books can transform a person’s life. Likewise, Lulu Delacre reveals through her captivating illustrations how art can tell a moving story.” READ MORE……

AWARD WINNING KADIR NELSON CREATES ‘SUMMERTIME CITY’ ILLUSTRATION FOR THE NEW YORKER
Newsletter / July 22, 2018

KADIR NELSON CREATES NEW ‘SUMMERTIME CITY’ ILLUSTRATION FOR ‘THE NEW YORKER’   Kadir Nelson: “I was poring over photographs of neighborhood kids playing in the street, and I found an old photo from the nineteen-sixties of a kid wearing goggles as he basked in the spray unleashed by a fire hydrant. It made perfect sense to me. If you can’t make it to the pool or the beach, why not still wear goggles? It was so imaginative and practical. For some kids, the fire hydrant is the pool or the ocean.” READ MORE… ________________________________________ ONLY 1% OF CHILDREN’S BOOKS HAVE B.A.M.E. MAIN CHARACTERS – UK STUDY Only 1% of British children’s books feature a main character who is black or minority ethnic, a investigation into representations of people of colour has found, with the director calling the findings “stark and shocking”. This compares to the 32.1% of schoolchildren of minority ethnic origins in England identified by the Department of Education last year. …the late American children’s author Walter Dean Myers (wrote in 2014 “Books transmit values. They explore our common humanity. What is the message when some children are not represented in those books? … Where are black children going…

ASSURING ACCESS TO LITERACY FOR INCARCERATED TEENS
Newsletter / July 15, 2018

LITERACY SPOTLIGHT: LITERACY FOR INCARCERATED TEENS From realistic YA fiction to memoirs and manga, students at Passages (a New York City Department of Education school network that serves youth ages 16 and younger in secure and non-secure detention) read what any other students would, with Walter Dean Myers and Coe Booth being two favorites. The organization’s Authors and Artists series was in part inspired by Walter Dean Myers, who was among the first to visit students in the Passages network: “[The students] just loved him,” Sick said. “And so we had the idea to get other authors.” READ MORE… __________________________________________ ROMANTIC OR RACIST? PERCEPTIONS SHIFT ON ‘LITTLE HOUSE ON THE PRAIRIE’ Known more for their cozy depictions of pioneer life, Ms. Wilder’s novels also include instances of racism and comparisons of Native people with animals. Many Native Americans have long felt uncomfortable with the books – with National Book Award winner Louise Erdrich writing her own series, “The Birchbark House,” in response. READ MORE…. __________________________________________ MAY YOU PATH BE BLESSED: LEGENDARY AUTHOR PAULO COELHO TO MALALA As Pakistan’s adored activist Malala Yousafzai tours Brazil, marking her first visit to Latin America, to kick off the expansion of her education charity, famed…