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THE LEGACY OF TITLE IX FOR TODAY’S WOMEN
Newsletter / June 23, 2019

YES, THE US WOMEN’S SOCCER TEAM IS DOMINANT. THAT’S BECAUSE MOST OF THE WORLD IS PLAYING CATCH-UP. “You have to imagine a time when there were just essentially no team sports for girls,” said Karen Blumenthal, author of the book “: The Law That Changed the Future of Girls in America.” “From my perspective as someone who was a teenager in the ’70s … this was just a huge change in the world.” Though the law was signed in 1972, it still took years for many schools and universities to fully comply, Blumenthal says. But as more did, this spurred athletics participation among women and girls, as more and more high schools and colleges added soccer programs. For women’s soccer in particular, this triggered explosive growth. READ MORE… TRIUMPH WITHOUT BEING MEAN: 3 KIDS’ BOOKS SHOW HOW Fleischman’s collage of a story pays tribute to the differences but finds the common thread in all of them, as the smallest and most vulnerable triumph because of their inner strength, whether their goal is to feed a hungry family, win favor with parents, or rule a kingdom. As the story goes, “That speck of a lad? He became king.” READ MORE…   COVER REVEAL:…

NATIONAL ANTIRACIST & CHILDREN’S BILINGUAL BOOK FESTIVALS
Newsletter / April 28, 2019

FIRST NATIONAL ANTIRACIST BOOK FESTIVAL LAUNCHED BY NATIONAL BOOK AWARD WINNER Washington, D.C.–based American University will be the site of the first National Antiracist Book Festival, providing a platform for nearly 50 authors and publishing professionals to discuss policies and power structures that fuel racism in America, as well as the efforts being made to dismantle those systems…. Young adult authors Jason Reynolds and Jacqueline Woodson will talk with one another about “Writing to capture the hearts and minds of youth.” READ MORE…   NHCC HOSTS CHILDREN’S READING FESTIVAL “Margarita (Engle) came here last May to read from her books,” recalled Martínez, NHCC director of history and literary arts and festival organizer. “I asked her afterwards what can we do at the (National Hispanic Cultural Center) NHCC that is not happening elsewhere. She said there are very few bilingual book festivals in the country.” Their conversation was about Spanish and English. But the NHCC’s festival expands “bilingualism” to include Native American languages, Martínez said. READ MORE…   SPRING 2019 PUBLISHER’S PREVIEW: FIVE QUESTIONS FOR ELOISE GREENFIELD Why are people afraid of poetry? I don’t see the fear. When I watch poets or teachers reading poetry to children and/or adults, the…

Celebrating Connections With Children’s Literature
Newsletter / October 22, 2018

JANE ADDAMS CHILDREN’S BOOK AWARD CEREMONY FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2018                                                                     Sara Holbrook author of  Winner for Older Readers: The Enemy: Detroit 1954 (upper photo) Laura Atkins & Stan Yogi authors of  Honor for Older Readers: Fred Korematsu Speaks Up with  Heather Palmer (center) selection committee chair (lower left photo) Susan Freiss (r) committee member with James E. Ransome illustrator & Lesa Cline-Ransome author of Honor for Younger Readers: Before She Was Harriet  (lower right photo) DIVERSITY AND DEEP CONNECTIONS FOR CHILDREN’S AUTHORS, EDITORS, AND BOOKSELLERS AT NAIBA 2018 Receiving both the Carla Cohen Free Speech Award and the Book of the Year Award, Ghost Boys author Rhodes captured the energy of the conference, harnessing it in a rousing 30-minute speech on racial violence in America that garnered a standing ovation. Rhodes shared the story of her own life, interwoven with descriptions of how she came to write the book. READ MORE… ANNOUNCING THE 2019 ONE BOOK, ONE PHILADELPHIA SELECTION The Free Library of Philadelphia and the Mayor’s Office today announced the novel Sing, Unburied, Sing by Jesmyn…

Book Reading Leads to Lifelong Learning and Brings People Together
Newsletter / June 24, 2018

Book reading aims to bring people together Organizers chose “Towers Falling” (by Jewell Parker Rhodes) for its breadth of themes and the conversations it could spark. … the book also offers conversational fodder beyond 9/11. Its protagonist lives with her family in various homeless shelters around New York City. Her father is mentally ill. The organizers of this project saw the book as an opportunity not just to connect the community through a shared past, but to talk about issues that members of the Jackson community face today. Read more… ___________________________________________________________________ Valley Author Pens “Zoot Suit” Novel For Young Adults Seventy five years ago this month, the streets of Los Angeles turned violent in an event that came to be known as the Zoot Suit Riots. The cause is still unclear, but we know this: for 10 days in 1943, white service members attacked young Latino men on the streets of Southern California, while police turned the other way. The attacks are the subject of a new young adult novel by acclaimed children’s author Margarita Engle. Read more…. ___________________________________________________________________ Author gets intimate: Acclaimed Haitian-American writer talks hot-button topics at P’Heights library A celebrated Haitian-American author (Edwidge Danticat) will discuss how such polarizing issues as immigration and…