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Justice Sonia Sotomayor chooses Lulu Delacre to illustrate her memoir for young people
Newsletter / May 12, 2018

JUSTICE SONIA SOTOMAYOR HIGHLIGHTS THE ‘WONDERS’ OF READING IN NEW MEMOIR FOR KIDS: SEE THE COVER! For Sotomayor, the illustrations in Turning Pages are just as important as the story itself. The Justice chose Lulu Delacre as illustrator because she felt connected to the Puerto Rican-born artist, who has a background that’s similar to Sotomayor’s own. When she saw Delacre’s work for the first time it “shone bright” for her, Sotomayor explained. Read more   ARTS: PAM MUNOZ RYAN TO RECEIVE ZARROW AWARD FRIDAY    Ryan began her career as a bilingual Head Start teacher and a director for an early childhood program. It was as she was working on a master’s degree at San Diego State University that one of her professors urged her to pursue a career in professional writing.   Read more   MEET PAM MUNOZ RYAN, WINNER OF THE 2018 ZARROW AWARD  …we offer a chat with Pam Muñoz Ryan, the prolific American writer for children and young adults who often produces books with multicultural and/or progressive themes. Ryan is the winner of the 2018 Anne V. Zarrow Award, which is given annually by the Tulsa Library Trust. Read more   BRUNSWICK LIBRARY OPENS EXHIBIT SHOWCASING…

Jacqueline Woodson, newly named 2018 Wilder Winner, Calls for the End of the Label “Struggling Reader” #JACBA Newsletter 16Feb2018
Newsletter / February 18, 2018

Stop Using the Label ‘Struggling Reader,’ Author Jacqueline Woodson Advises Woodson: Any kind of qualifier can be harmful because who we are is not static. Our abilities are constantly changing. What does it mean to be a struggling reader? I know if I was raised in this day and age, I would have been labeled a struggling reader. But what I know now is I was actually reading like a writer. I was reading slowly and deliberately and deconstructing language, not in the sense of looking up words in the dictionary, but understanding from context. I was constantly being compared to my sister who excelled, and it made me feel insecure. What gets translated is ‘you are not as good,’ and that gets translated into our whole bodies. That’s where the danger lies. Read More Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by E.B. Lewis 2013 Awardee From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun by Jacqueline Woodson 1996 Awardee I Hadn’t Meant to Tell You This by Jacqueline Woodson 1995 Awardee ALA Awards: Jacqueline Woodson wins 2018 Wilder Award Jacqueline Woodson is the winner of the 2018 Laura Ingalls Wilder Award honoring an author or illustrator, published in the United States,…

‘Maybe it’s time for all of us to talk,’ addressing violence and discrimination #JACBA Newsletter 9Nov2017
Newsletter / November 11, 2017

Book Highlight: part 1 This first installment of our multi-part series on the 2017 Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Ceremony features an introduction given by Book Award Committee Member Julie Olsen-Edwards for Wolf Hollow, written by Lauren Wolk, published by Random House Children’s Books, named an Honor Book in the Books for Older Children. Introduction by Julie Olsen-Edwards Wolf Hollow, written by Lauren Wolk and published by Dutton Children’s Books, an imprint of Dutton, Random House is a beautifully written, compelling, coming of age novel set in rural World War II Pennsylvania. It is the story of the damage done by war – even after the soldiers come home; about the power of fear and bias to close the eyes of good people to what is happening around them, and of a young girl’s discovery of her own moral compass and courage. Almost twelve-year-old Annabelle encounters almost incorrigible cruelty for the first time when a school mate, Betty, focuses on Annabelle and her younger brothers and then places blame on Toby, a troubled, homeless, World War I veteran. As false accusations take hold of the town, Annabelle’s awareness of the world’s unfairness grows and step by step leads her to…

Illustrated Books About Women Who Changed The World #JACBA Newsletter 28Jul2017
Newsletter / July 29, 2017

14 Illustrated Books About Women Who Changed The World ‘Girls Think of Everything: Stories of Ingenious Inventions by Women’ by Catherine Thimmesh and Melissa Sweet (Illustrator) Women have invented some pretty amazing things throughout history – you just didn’t know it. Girls Think of Everything is a smart collection of stories, each with a compelling voice that makes you feel part of the stories themselves. ‘Hillary Rodham Clinton: Dreams Taking Flight’ by Kathleen Krull and Amy June Bates (Illustrator) If you have a thing for books that tell the stories of inspiring female politicians, look no futher: Kathleen Krull and Amy June Bates’ account of Hillary Clinton’s life will take you on an inspired journey through her younger years. ‘Me, Frida’ by Amy Novesky and David Díaz (Illustrator) Connect with the life of Frida Kahlo with this playful, poetic and mesmerizing book, styled after Frida’s artwork. Written by Amy Novesky and illustrated by David Diaz, this book tells the tale of her early days in San Francisco with her husband, the artist Diego Rivera. Frida struggled to find a muse, speak a foreign language, and learn to live a life that didn’t yet belong to her, but once she did,…

Inspired Feminist Children’s Books On the Rise #JACBA Newsletter 1Jun2017
Newsletter / June 4, 2017

15 Feminist Children’s Books That Will Inspire Readers Of Any Age Girls Think of Everything: Stories of Ingenious Inventions by Women by Catherine Thimmesh and Melissa Sweet tells the stories of the women who invented everything from windshield wipers, to liquid paper white-out, to aircraft bumpers, to the chocolate chip cookie, and more. I Dissent: Ruth Bader Ginsburg Makes Her Mark by Debbie Levy and Elizabeth Baddeley tells the (condensed, simplified) version of the amazing life and achievements of Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, while combating the idea that young girls and women should always be agreeable, accommodating, and non-confrontational – a lesson I know that at least I need to keep learning over and over. The Invisible Princess by Faith Ringgold is an African American fairy tale set during slavery, telling the story of one couple whose wishes for their child come true in ways they never could have imagined. That daughter becomes the Invisible Princess, who will one day liberate her parents from slavery, and bring freedom to all the slaves on the plantation. This one is a great reminder of the difference just one individual can make – invisible or not. Read More Brave Girl: Clara…

Necessary New Exhibition Highlights the Activism of Black Female Artists #JACBA Newsletter 12May2017
Newsletter / May 13, 2017

This Necessary New Exhibition Highlights the Activism of Black Female Artists Q: Faith Ringgold is a cornerstone of the exhibition-several of her works appear, including ‘For the Women’s House.’ Can you talk about her role in and impact on black feminism? A: Beyond her incredible work and long career, one of the reasons for her strong presence in We Wanted a Revolution is her simultaneous commitment to art, feminism, and social justice. Ringgold is one of the few artists included in the exhibition who aligned herself with the mainstream feminist movement, though she, like other black women, often found it lacking, and identified more pointedly as a black feminist. For the Women’s House incorporates suggestions offered to Ringgold by the incarcerated women. It imagines a series of positive female role models of all races and economic backgrounds, including the first female president, professional women basketball players, and women working as doctors, engineers, and bus drivers, among other vocations not always open to women at the time-and still. Read More Aunt Harriet’s Underground Railroad in the Sky by Faith Ringgold 1993 Awardee Bicentennial commencement features music, history, awards During the ceremony, the university honored 10 alumni with Bicentennial Alumni Awards. The…