Weekly JACBA Newsletter 11Jun2015

We Need Diverse Books At BookCon 2015 Showed Us 8 Reasons Why Diverse Books Are More Powerful Than Ever

Many writers lauded the power of social media to shed light on issues like the lack of authentic representation of minorities in children’s literature. As Jacqueline Woodson pointed out, “the ferocity of young people” sharing their opinions (and, well, rage, too) on the Internet is astounding — especially when it’s being used for good.

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Each Kindness by Jacqueline Woodson 2013 Awardee
From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun by Jacqueline Woodson 1996
I Hadn’t Meant to Tell You This by Jacqueline Woodson 1995


Award winning author and peace activist speaks to Meaford students

Award winning Canadian author, feminist and peace activist Deborah Ellis spoke to hundreds of local students on May 25 and had a simple message: stay informed, get involved and keep reading.

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The Heaven Shop by Deborah Ellis 2005 Awardee
The Breadwinner Trilogy by Deborah Ellis 2004 Awardee
Parvana’s Journey by Deborah Ellis 2003 Awardee


Elder Portraits to grace Art Wall

Award winning Plains Cree artist George Littlechild helps students to express history and culture through art as part of the Elder Portraits project.

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This Land Is My Land by George Littlechild 1994 Awardee


The Course of Happiness by Louise Erdrich

Literary Time Travel Short Story

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The Birchbark House by Louise Erdrich 2000 Awardee


2015 Read to Me Conference

Award-winning children’s book author and illustrator, James Rumford, joins us in studio to talk about some of the benefits of reading aloud and also tell us about the 2015 Read to Me Conference happening on June 8 and 9 at the Hawaii Convention Center.

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Silent Music: A Story of Baghdad by James Rumford 2009 Awardee
Sequoyah: The Cherokee Man Who Gave His People Writing by James Rumford 2005 Awardee


Poet Laureate George Ella Lyon: Helping Others Find Their Voice

Lyon credits her love of books and writing to her parents, who were the first in their families to finish high school and attend college. Her father, who worked at a dry cleaner in Harlan, loved poetry and would read a poem after supper each night.

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You and Me and Home Sweet Home by George Ella Lyon and Stephanie Anderson 2010 Awardee


BEA 2015: Spotlight on African-American Children’s Authors and Illustrators

The illustrators spoke about their personal motivations for entering the field of children’s literature and what continues to move them to create new books. Admitting that, earlier in his career as a fine artist, he “came in reluctantly to this business,” Lewis realized that “some of the best art is happening” in children’s books and quickly became entranced by the role he was able to play in “enticing children to become life-long learners” through his picture book illustrations. Evans discussed both the exertion and joy of telling powerful stories (he noted how it’s sometimes “painful to go through the process of getting stories out”) as well as what he perceives to be the “magic” of the world of publishing, with its opportunities to reach and transform so many young lives through books.

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We March written and illustrated by Shane W. Evans 2013 Awardee
Each Kindness written by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by E.B. Lewis 2013 Awardee
Night Boat to Freedom by Margot Theis Raven with pictures by E. B. Lewis 2007 Awardee


Jacqueline Woodson named young people’s poet laureate

“I think many people believe and want others to believe that poetry is for the precious, entitled, educated few,” Woodson said in an interview with the Poetry Foundation. “And that’s just not true. Our children’s first words are poems — poems we and our listeners are delighted to hear and eager to understand. Rap is poetry. Spoken word is poetry. Poetry lives in our everyday.”

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Each Kindness by Jacqueline Woodson 2013 Awardee
From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun by Jacqueline Woodson 1996
I Hadn’t Meant to Tell You This by Jacqueline Woodson 1995


Journey to Jo’burg is inspiration to students at The Academy at Shotton Hall

DRAMA club students yesterday (Thursday, June 4) marked 30 years of the modern classic Journey to Jo’burg with a performance inspired by the book – once banned by South Africa’s apartheid regime.
Year 8 drama students at The Academy at Shotton Hall, in Peterlee, were joined by author Beverley Naidoo at at East Durham College’s Lubetkin Theatre.

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Out of Bounds: Seven Stories of Conflict and Hope by Beverley Naidoo 2004 Awardee
The Other Side of Truth by Beverley Naidoo 2002 Awardee


‘Brown Girl Dreaming’ author inspires MNPS students

“I write because I have all these questions, and when you write, you figure things out,” said award-winning author Jacqueline Woodson (Miracle’s Boys, Brown Girl Dreaming), addressing a gathering of students from Creswell Middle Prep School of the Arts.

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Each Kindness by Jacqueline Woodson 2013 Awardee
From the Notebooks of Melanin Sun by Jacqueline Woodson 1996
I Hadn’t Meant to Tell You This by Jacqueline Woodson 1995

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